Sample Syllabus

Hum101 Course Outline, 2015-16
Course theme: “Find freedom in the context you inherit”

Our course theme this year comes from “Goodbye, Snauq” (2004) by Stó:lō Squamish writer Lee Maracle, which we’ll read for our second class. Weekly themes (in italics) are also drawn from this essay. Here are the opening paragraphs:

Raven has never left this place, but sometimes it feels like she has been negligent, maybe even a little dense. Raven shaped us; we are built for transformation. Our stories prepare us for it. Find freedom in the context you inherit—every context is different: discover consequences and change from within, that is the challenge. Still there is horror in having change foisted upon you from outside. Raven did not prepare us for the past 150 years. She must have fallen asleep some time around the first smallpox epidemic, when the Tsleil-Waututh Nation nearly perished, and I am not sure she ever woke up.
The halls of this [academic] institution are empty. The bright white fluorescent bulbs that dot the ceiling are hidden behind great long light fixtures dimming its length…. I trudge down the dim hallway; my small hands clutch a bright white envelope.

Term 1
SEPTEMBER
Part 1: Every context is different.

Tuesday Sept 15, Orientation with Hum faculty and staff: Every context is different… so, in whose and which context do we all meet together to create these courses? Meet and greet upon Musqueam First Nations traditional, unceded, ancestral territory, inhabited continually for 4,000+ years, at the Point Grey campus of the University of British Columbia, now 100-years-old.

Thursday Sept 17, First Nations and Indigenous Studies & English Studies: Today I am entitled to dream. Khahtsahlano dreamed of being buried at Snauq. I dream of living there: Why Indigenous Literatures Matter, with Daniel Heath Justice (Cherokee), First Nations and Indigenous Studies, and English, UBC.

Reading:
– Grace, Patricia. 1987. “Butterflies.” Electric City and Other Stories. Auckland, N.Z.:   Penguin Books.
– Joe, Rita. 2013. “I Lost My Talk.” An Anthology of Canadian Native Literature. Eds. Daniel David Moses, Terry Goldie, Armand Garnet Ruffo. Toronto: Oxford University Press. 4-5.
– Maracle, Lee. 2010. “Goodbye, Snauq.” First Wives Club: Coast Salish Style. Penticton: Theytus Books. 13-28.

Tuesday Sept 22, First Nations and Indigneous Studies: Finding freedom in the [academic] context you inherit: Academic Activism, with Daniel Heath Justice.

Reading:
– McLeod, Neal. 2000. “Indigenous Studies: Negotiating the Space Between Tribal Communities and Academia.” Expressions in Canadian Native Studies. Ed. Ron F. Laliberte. Saskatoon: University Extension Press. 27-39.

Thursday Sept 24, First Nations Studies & Art: Finding freedom in the [cultural] context you inherit: How my ancestors acquired a sense of humour, with Beau Dick, Kwakwaḵaw̱a’kw Hereditary Chief and Artist-in-Residence, Art History and Visual Art, UBC.

Tuesday Sept 29, First Nations Studies and Art:
 Still there is horror in having change foisted upon you from outside: On Potlatching and Indian residential schools, with Beau Dick.

Reading:
– Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art. 2015. “Atłaki̕ma: Dance of the Forest Spirits.” Vancouver.
– Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art. 2015. “Siwidi.” Vancouver.
– Laurence, Robin. “The Box of Treasures: Gifts from the Supernatural.” Georgia Straight 10 March, 2015. N.p. Web.
– Reid, Martine. 2012. “The Irony of Things: Humour in Contemporary Northwest Coast Art.” Carrying on Regardless. Vancouver: Bill Reid Gallery of the Northwest Coast.

OCTOBER
Thursday Oct 1, First Nations Studies & Anthropology:
 
Raven has never left this place. Tour of MOA (Museum of Anthropology) with Sue Rowley, Curator of Public Archaeology/Circumpolar/Pacific Northwest and Director of the Laboratory of Archaeology, MOA and Anthropology, UBC.

Reading:
– Muntean, Reese, et al. 2015. “ʔeləwkw – Belongings: A Tangible Interface for Intangible Cultural Heritage.” Electronic Visualisation and the Arts. London, UK. 360-366.
– Musqueam Indian Band. 2006. Musqueam: A Living Culture. Victoria: CopperMoon Communications.

Tuesday Oct 6, First Nations and Endangered Languages: Raven shaped us; we are built for transformation. Our stories prepare us for it: Language Diversity at Risk, with Jorge Emilio Rosés Labrada, First Nations and Endangered Languages, and Anthropology, UBC.

Reading:
– Krauss, Michael. 1992. “The world’s languages in crisis.” Language 68.1: 4-10.
– Ladefoged, Peter. 1992. “Another view of endangered languages.” Language 68.4: 809-811.
– Dorian, Nancy. 1993. “A Response to Ladefoged’s Other View of Endangered Languages.” Language 69.3: 575-679.

Part 2: Every context is different: discover consequences and change from within, that is the challenge.

Thursday Oct 8, Philosophy:
 Discovering consequences: “S/he has the most who is most content with the least,” said Diogenes, a 4th Century BCE philosopher, with Sylvia Berryman, Philosophy, UBC.

Reading:
– Laertius, Diogenes. 2015 (3rd Century CE). “Life of Diogenes” (excerpts). The Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers. Trans. C.D. Young.

Tuesday Oct 13, Philosophy:
 Finding freedom in the context you inherit: Ancient Greek Philosophers, with Sylvia Berryman.

Reading:
– Epictetus. 1983 (135 CE). The Handbook (The Encheiridion). Trans. Nicholas P. White. Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Company.

Thursday Oct 15, Philosophy: Discover…from within: What are our philosophical perspectives? with Ana Harland, Philosophy and Continuing Education, UBC.

Reading:
– Pojman, Louis. 2006. “What Is Philosophy?” Philosophical Traditions. Toronto: Thomson/Wadsworth Publishing. 3-11.

Tuesday Oct 20, Education: Light fixtures: Assignment writing workshop, with Margot Leigh Butler and Wil Steele, Hum, UBC.

Reading:
– Butler, Margot Leigh. 2015. “Essay Writing Workshop.” Custom handout.

Part 3: The bright white fluorescent bulbs that dot the ceiling are hidden behind great long light fixtures dimming its length.

Thursday Oct 22, Cultural Studies: Finding freedom in the [everyday] context you inherit: Culture is Ordinary, with Margot Leigh Butler.

Reading:
– Williams, Raymond. 2002 (1958). “Culture is Ordinary.” The Everyday Life Reader. Ed. Ben Highmore. London: Routledge. 91-100.
– Williams, Raymond. 1976. Keywords, A Vocabulary of Culture and Society (selections). London: Fontana Press.

Tuesday Oct 27, Cultural Studies and History:
 Hidden behind great long light fixtures, dimming: From the Enlightenment to Globalization, with Margot Leigh Butler.

Reading:
– “Age of Enlightenment.” Wikipedia.
– Evans, Mary. 2006. “The Making of the Modern World.” Short History of Society. Berkshire, U.K.: McGraw Hill Open University Press. 1-21.

Thursday Oct 29, Globalization: For the past 150+ years: Films about globalization, with Paul Woodhouse, Hum, UBC.

Reading:
– Biddle, Tony. 2004. “Globalization: Who’s Winning and Who’s Losing.” Canadian Labour Conference.
– Black, Stephanie. 2003. Life and Debt. New York Films.

NOVEMBER
Sunday Nov 1, Architecture: 
Walking tour of Vancouver architecture with Arthur Allen, architect.

Tuesday Nov 3, Architecture: Dot the ceiling, with Arthur Allen.

Reading:
– Allen, Arthur. 2013. “The Architecture of Confinement Design for Human Rights.” Unpublished.

Thursday Nov 5, Education: Bright envelopes: Who inspires you, and how are we inspired together? with Ryanne James, Musqueam Youth Program and First Nations House of Learning, UBC.

Reading:
– Kritek, Phyllis Beck. “Recognizing an Uneven Table.” Negotiating at an Uneven Table: Developing Moral Courage in Resolving Our Conflicts. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. 34-44.
– Mindell, Arnold.1995. “Rank: A Double Signal.” Sitting in the Fire: Large Group Transformation Using Conflict and Diversity. Portland, OR.: Lao Tse. 49-60.
– Mindell, Arnold. 1995. “Power & Prejudice In Relationship.” Sitting in the Fire: Large Group Transformation Using Conflict and Diversity. Portland, OR.: Lao Tse. 61-73.

Tuesday Nov 10, Critical Race Theory:
 Sometimes it feels like [the way “race” has been conceptualized] has been negligent, maybe even a little dense, with Sadira Rodrigues, Emily Carr University of Art and Design.

Reading:
– Hall, Stuart. 1997. “The spectacle of the other.” Representation: Cultural Representatives and Signifying Practices. Ed. Stuart Hall. London: Sage. 225-234.

Thursday Nov 12, Critical Race Theory: Between: living in the hyphen, directed and written by Anne Marie Nakagawa, 2005 (National Film Board of Canada), with Margot Leigh Butler.

Reading:
– Chychota, Julie. 2008. Rev. of Between: Living in the Hyphen, by Anne Marie Nakagawa. CM XIV.12.
– Compton, Wade. 2010. “Pheneticizing versus Passing.” After Canaan: Essays on Race, Writing and Region. Vancouver: Arsenal Pulp Press. 19-59.
– Nakagawa, Anne Marie. 2006. Between: Living in the Hyphen. Dir. Anne Marie Nakagawa. National Film Board of Canada. DVD.

Part 4: Our stories prepare us for…
…for transformation.

Tuesday Nov 17, Poetry:
 My small hands clutch a bright white envelope: Words that seek to convey, and to evoke musicality, with Ted Byrne, poet and translator, Kootenay School of Writing, Vancouver.

Thursday Nov 19, 
Poetry: She woke up:
 Poetry and meaning, with Ted Byrne.

Reading:
– Byrne, Ted. 2015. Poetry Compilation. Unpublished.

Tuesday Nov 24, Sociology: Raven did not prepare us for the past 150 years: Marx and Engels’ The Communist Manifesto (1848), with Tom Kemple, Sociology, UBC.

Reading:
– Marx, Karl and Friedrich Engels. 1969 (1848). The Communist Manifesto. Moscow: Progress Publishers.

Thursday Nov 26, Sociology:
 Finding freedom in the [social] context you inherit, with Tom Kemple.

Reading:
– Klein, Naomi. 2000. “New Branded World.” No Logo. London: Flamingo. 25-45.

DECEMBER
Tuesday Dec 1, Art and Cultural Studies:
 
Finding Freedom [through changing, creatively and unexpectedly] in the context you inherit, with Margot Leigh Butler, Hum.

Reading:
– Kabakov, Ilya. 1989. Ten Characters. New York: ICA.
– Hum. 2013. Where There’s Walls There’s Holes. Vancouver: Humanities 101 Community Programme.
– Hum. 2015. No Carrots No Sticks. Vancouver: Humanities 101 Community Programme.

Thursday Dec 3, Philosophy:
 Finding Freedom in Foucault, with Christina Hendricks, Philosophy, UBC.

Reading:
– Foucault, Michel. 2015. “Michel Foucault, quotes about power.” Ed. Christina Hendricks.
– Taylor, Dianna, ed. 2010. Michel Foucault: Key Concepts. Durham, U.K.: Acumen.
– Mills, Sara. 2003. Michel Foucault. London: Routledge.

Term 2
JANUARY

Tuesday Jan 5, Cultural Studies: Whadda YOU mean? Semiotics Workshop, with Margot Leigh Butler, Hum, UBC.

Reading:
– Sturken, Marita, and Lisa Cartwright. 2001. “Practices of Looking: Images, Power and Politics.” Practices of Looking. New York: Oxford University Press. 10-44.
– Crawshaw, Steve, and John Jackson. 2010. Small Acts of Resistance: How Courage, Tenacity, and Ingenuity Can Change the World. New York: Union Square.

Thursday Jan 7, Music: Humming for FREEDOM, with Gage Averill, Dean of Arts, UBC.

Tuesday Jan 12, Cultural Studies: Here’s looking at YOU: Semiotic analysis of photographs of Downtown Eastside women figured as heroin addicts, with Margot Leigh Butler, Hum, UBC.

Reading:
– Butler, Margot Leigh. 2004. “The Hero of ‘Heroines’: Photographs by Lincoln Clarkes.” Mosaic: a Journal for the Interdisciplinary Study of Literature 37.4 (December): 275-296.

Thursday Jan 14, Forestry:
 FoREst bathing: Exploring the links between well-being and nature through the Happiness Index and Community Forestry, with D’Arcy Davis-Case, Forestry, UBC.

Reading:
– Chupein, Thomas. 2010. “Discovering Gross National Happiness.” Voices of Tomorrow.
– Darlington, Susan M. 1998. “The Ordination of a Tree: The Buddhist Ecology Movement in Thailand.” Ethnology 37.1: 1-15.

Tuesday Jan 19, Theatre:
 INHERITed mythologies on the stage: Orpheus and Eurydice, with Florian Gassner, Department of Central, Eastern and Northern European Studies, UBC.

Reading:
– Ruhl, Sarah. 2005. “Eurydice.” Divine Fire: Eight Contemporary Plays Inspired by the Greeks. Ed. Caridad Svich. New York: Back Stage. 280-328.

Thursday Jan 22, Theatre: “Eurydice,” at Fredrick Wood Theatre.

Tuesday Jan 26, Hum:
 YOUr Hum year IN CONTEXT, with Paul Woodhouse, Hum, UBC.

Reading:
– The Learning Centre. 2010. “Reflective Writing.” The University of New South Wales.

Thursday Jan 28, Anthropology:
 Cyber Anthropology and Communications: BloggINg, with Wil Steele, Hum, UBC.

Reading:
– Leaning, M. 2011. “Understanding Blogs: Just another Medium?” The End of Journalism? Eds. A. Charles and G. Stewart. London: Peter Lang. 87-98
– Radsch, Courtney C. 2012. “Unveiling the Revolutionaries: Cyberactivism and the Role of Women in the Arab Uprisings.” Houston, TX.: Rice University James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy Research Paper.
– The Mentor. 1986. “The Conscience of a Hacker.” Phrack Inc.

FEBRUARY
Tuesday Feb 2, First Nations and Indigenous Studies:
 
FINDing our way with the help of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s 2015 “Calls to Action.” Screening of Finding Our Way, a film by Leonie Sandercock and Giovanni Attili, 2010, School for Community and Regional Planning, UBC.

Reading:
– Fletcher, Wendy. 2011. “What Were We Thinking: Ten Windows on the Past.”
– The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. 2015. Introduction. Honoring the Truth, Reconciling for the Future: Summary of the Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. 2015. 1-22.
– The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. 2015. “Calls to Action.” Honoring the Truth, Reconciling for the Future: Summary of the Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. 2015. 319-337.
– “What is the Royal Proclamation? Indigenous Foundations. UBC.

Thursday Feb 4, Indigenous Feminisms and Literature:
 FIND FREEDOM IN THE CONTEXT YOU INHERIT, with Lee Maracle, member of the Stó:lō nation, Aboriginal Studies, University of Toronto.

Reading:
– Maracle, Lee. 2010. “Goodbye, Snauq.” First Wives Club: Coast Salish Style. Penticton: Theytus Books. 13-28.
– Maracle, Lee. 2015. Memory Serves and Other Essays. Edmonton: NeWest Press. 1-33.

Tuesday Feb 9, Field trip: The word CON means “together or with,” so what TEXTs hinge us together and turn our ME into WE here at UBC? Tour of the university libraries with Sarah Dupont, Aboriginal Engagement Librarian, X̱wi7xw̱a library.

Reading:
– Borges, Jorge Luis. 2000. “The Library of Babel.” Ficciones. Trans. J.E.I. New York: Grove Press.

Thursday Feb 11, First Nations and Endangered Languages:
 The Honesty of chIldreN: the value of motHER tongues and local languages for communITies, with Mark Turin, First Nations and Endangered Languages, UBC.

Reading:
– Turin, Mark. 2005. “Language Endangerment and Linguistic Rights in the Himalayas: A Case Study from Nepal.” Mountain Research and Development 25.1: 4-9.
– Shaw, Patricia. 2001. “Language and Identity, Language and the Land.” BC Studies 131: 39-55.

UBC Reading break, no classes Feb 15-19.

Tuesday Feb 23, Art: The FREEDOM to MashUp as a creative and critical practice, technique and tactic, for starters, with M. Simon Levin, Emily Carr University of Art and Design.

Reading:
– Kabakov, Ilya. 1989. Ten Characters. New York: ICA.
– Laurence, Robin. “Barbara Kruger Transforms Vancouver Art Gallery’s Rotunda for Bold MashUp Show.” The Georgia Straight 10 February 2016. N.p. Web.
– Laurence, Robin. “MashUp charts modern culture’s mad mixing: The Vancouver Art Gallery’s monumental new show links everyone from Picasso to Basquiat and Tarantino.” The Georgia Straight 10 February 2016. N.p. Web.

Thursday Feb 25, Psychology:
 What is your relationship with yourself? FINDing FREEDOM through mindfulness, self-compassion, and self-kindness, with Caer Weber, facilitator at the Mood Disorders Association of British Columbia.

Reading:
– Langer, Ellen J. 2000. “Mindful Learning.” Current Directions in Psychological Science 9.6: 220-223.
– Cornell, Ann Weiser. 1996. “The Power of Focusing.” The Power of Focusing. Oakland, CA.: New Harbinger Publications.
– Cornell, Ann Weiser. 1996. “Being a good listener to your self.” The Power of Focusing. Oakland, CA.: New Harbinger Publications.

MARCH
Tuesday Mar 1, Art:
 
Field Trip: Tour of the exhibition “MashUp: The Birth of Modern Culture.”

Thursday Mar 3, English:
 CONTEXT confusion In Our Time (Ernest Hemingway, 1925): Making sense of the lost generation of World War 1, with Michael Zeitlin, English, UBC.

Reading:
– Hemingway, Ernest. 1925. In Our Time. University of Virginia: AS Hypertext.

Tuesday Mar 8, International Women’s Day, Law:
 INHERITed legal rights, responsibilities and FREEDOMs: “Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms,” “Universal Declaration of Human Rights,” and “Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women” with Margot Young, Allard School of Law, UBC.

Reading:
– Canada. 1982. Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, s 2, Part I of the Constitution Act, 1982, being Schedule B to the Canada Act 1982 (UK), c 11.
– United Nations General Assembly. 1948. Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 10 December 1948, 217 A (III).
– Vallquet, Dominique, and Katharine Simonds. 2011. Legislative Summary, Bill C-51: Investigative Powers for the 21st Century Act. Pub. No. 40-3-C51-E. Ottawa: Library of Parliament.

Thursday Mar 10, Law:
 United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People (UNDRIP). Article 1: Indigenous peoples have the right to the full enjoyment, as a collective or as individuals, of all human rights and fundamental FREEDOMs as recognized in the Charter of the United Nations, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, with Margot Young, Allard School of Law, UBC.

Reading:
– United Nations General Assembly. 2007. United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Resolution, 2 October 2007, A/RES/61/295.

Tuesday Mar 15, Rhetoric: FREE Speech? Making FREEDOM by altering CONTEXTs! This is what ME/WE WANT! Manifesto writing, with Margot Leigh Butler, Hum, UBC. This class was held with the Writing Class.

Reading:
– Brecht, Bertolt. 1940. “Writing the Truth: Five Difficulties.” Galileo. Ed. Eric Bentley. Trans. Charles Laughton. New York: Grove Press. 131-150.
– Ebert, Teresa. 2003. “Manifesto as Theory and Theory as Material Force: Toward a Red Polemic.” JAC 23.3: 553-562.
– Marinetti, F. T. 1973 (1909). “The Founding Manifesto of Futurism.” Documents of 20th Century Art. Trans. R. W. Flint, et al. New York: Viking Press. 19-24.

Thursday Mar 17, Writing and Publishing: Representing ourselves: showing our FREEDOM.
We are the Hum101/201 Class of 2015-16, graduating in Hum’s 17th year, and joining about 760 other Hum alumni. How do we represent ourselves, in actions and words and images—in photographs? Usually, class photos follow a standard format. In this class we took time to find a way to represent ourselves that took up our theme “FIND FREEDOM IN THE CONTEXT YOU INHERIT,” our year’s particular character and worked on final drafts of writing for our yearbook.

Tuesday Mar 22, Art and Cultural Studies:
 Using FREudian “FREE association” to follow our thoughts on FREEDOM…such as…FREE to, from, and every other direction; as liberation; as without monetary cost or worth; freedom as felt or not felt in myriad CONTEXTS; western-based universities are an INHERITance from Enlightenment “freedom, justice and knowledge projects,” so is Hum “university set free”? with Margot Leigh Butler and Reuben Jentink, Hum, UBC.

Reading:
– Bollas, Christopher. 2002. Free Association. New York: Totem Books. 3-20.
– Foucault, Michel. 1994 (1966). Preface. The Order of Things: An Archeology of the Human Sciences. New York: Vintage. xvi-xxvi.

Thursday Mar 24, Life Writing: Born Free?: Born naked and bawling, captured by life’s happenings, and set FREE in memoir writing, with Maureen Phillips, Hum Writing Coordinator and Continuing Studies, UBC.

Reading:
– Cullen, Yvonne. 2016. “Writing Training.”
– Miller, Patti. 2001. “Crafting the Story.” Writing your life, a journey of discovery. St. Leonards, Aus.: Allen & Urwin. 151-167.

Tuesday Mar 29, Research: How to maintain your FREEDOM and self-determination when you’re someone’s research subject, or, altering university-based research practices and CONTEXTs to protect Downtown Eastside/South residents’ and Hum’s FREEDOMs, with Margot Leigh Butler, Hum, UBC.

Reading:
– Assembly of First Nations. 2009. Ethics in First Nations Research.
– Government of Canada. 2014. Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans.
– Smith, Linda Tuhiwai. 1999. “Research Through Imperial Eyes.” Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples. London: Zed Books. 42-57.

Thursday Mar 31, English and First Nations and Indigenous Studies: Here goes the neighbourhood: changing spatial CONTEXT and FINDing oneself in the processes of gentrification, with David Gaertner, First Nations and Indigenous Studies, UBC.

Reading:
– Deering, Kathleen. 2012. “Not in My Neighbourhood: Sex Work and the Problem of Displacement.” West Coast Line 73.46: 18-26.
– Starnes, Jason and David Gaertner. 2012. “Here Comes the Neighbourhood: Encountering the Problem of the Neighbour in Space Introduction.” West Coast Line 73.46: 4-9.

APRIL
Tuesday Apr 5, Anthropology:
 FIND
+ show + tell: FINDing what we value at MOA (the Museum of Anthropology) and showing each other what it means to us, with Margot Leigh Butler, Hum.

Thursday Apr 7, Music: “One thing I can tell you is you got to be FREE / come together, right now, over me,” with Carol Sawyer, vocalist, visual artist, and Writing teacher.

Thursday Apr 28, Graduation Ceremony for all of this year’s Hum participants at the Museum of Anthropology (MOA).